Missionary God. Missionary Bible.

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TODAY’S READING: Isaiah 31–34 Isaiah 34 opens with the missionary call for all nations to come near and heed, that all the world would listen to the indignation God has against all nations. Isaiah spoke of the desolation demonic forces wrought when the missionary people of God were long absent. In verse 14 Isaiah mentioned…

TODAY’S READING: Isaiah 28–30 Isaiah wrote during the period of Assyrian ascendancy. The northern kingdom of Israel would fall first and Judah in the south would soon follow. God not only allowed Assyria to defeat His people—He expressly willed and empowered it. God’s people broke covenant and instead of being a missionary people, they themselves…

TODAY’S READING: Hosea 8–14 Hosea’s pain came from Israel committing adultery against God, soiling His knowledge and violating their covenant to bring the pure knowledge of Jehovah to nations. Adultery always traumatizes the children, and what spiritual descendants from among the nations can we possibly bless if we cheat on their Father? Hosea often spoke…

TODAY’S READING: Hosea 1–7 Hosea is the only prophet who was from Israel; all the others were from Judah. A contemporary of Amos, Hosea’s message was unique. While Amos spoke against oppression, injustice, and the greedy rich, Hosea spoke “against the worship of the Canaanite deities, such as Baal and Asherah. These religions stressed rituals…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Kings 18; 2 Chronicles 29–31; Psalm 48 Hezekiah became king at 25 and is remembered with honor for he did what his father David had done, sang David’s songs, and led his people to return to Jehovah Elohim of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Coming to terms with God’s missionary heart, Hezekiah lived…

TODAY’S READING: Isaiah 23–27 Isaiah is the most missionary of prophets for he cannot stop talking about the glory of God among all the nations. The indomitable vector of the Bible is the glory of God. Both nations and persons are invited to find their highest joy in worshiping Jehovah. The invitation is universal as…

TODAY’S READING: Isaiah 18–22 Concurrent to the fierce king Sargon’s rise in Babylon was that of Piankhy in Egypt. Sweeping up from Sudan, Piankhy instituted a dynasty known as “The Black Pharaohs” that overran Egypt and gave hope to smaller nations of the Fertile Crescent that they could rebel against Babylon. With the promise of…

TODAY’S READING: Isaiah 13–17 Isaiah who lived during the height of the Neo-Assyrian empire prophesied against the Neo-Babylonians at the height of their power—200 years into the future. God foretold through His prophets the destiny of nations. The day of the Lord does indeed come on all the nations, and the time comes when all…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Chronicles 28; 2 Kings 16–17 The story of Ahaz is a microcosm of Israel’s story and a harbinger of Judah’s future. Ahaz did not do what was right in the sight of the Lord as his father David did; rather he turned to the abominations of the nations. Because he forsook the…

TODAY’S READING: Micah The prophets foretell (speak to what will happen in the future) and forth-tell (speak to what we should be doing in the present), both in the light of God’s heart for His own glory among all peoples of the world. Micah is no exception. A contemporary of Isaiah, Micah pointed out that…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Chronicles 27; Isaiah 9–12 Isaiah 11 continues the theme of the eternal ruler from the house of David, the Rod and the Branch on whom the Spirit of the Lord shall rest (11:1–2). This Savior King whom the Gentiles will seek (v. 10) will rule forever and bring the whole world into…

TODAY’S READING: Amos 6–9 Amos, a simple shepherd, headed north to the neighboring country on his missionary assignment. The prosperity mixed with complacency irked the black-and-white, intolerant-of-the-selfish prophet, and he raged against the lavish lives of the rich, the oppression of the poor, and the ostentatious religious ceremony of the oppressors.[1] Obvious to Amos, the…

TODAY’S READING: Amos 1–5 A central component of prophetic responsibility is to remind all the earth, all the nations that they are under the authority of the Lord God of Israel. While God says to Israel, “You only have I known of all the families of the earth” (Amos 3:2), this was relayed through Amos…

TODAY’S READING: Isaiah 5–8 The indubitable missionary nature of Isaiah 6 is representative of the whole book. “The whole earth is full of His glory… Whom Shall I send, and who will go for us… Here I am send me” (6:3, 8). From beginning to end, Isaiah resounds with God’s missionary heart. Christopher Begg writes:…

TODAY’S READING: Isaiah 1–4 John York writes that the Old Testament prophets advance the missionary theme of the Bible in three major ways: “First, they brought something of a covenantal lawsuit against the people of God. In doing this, they often looked beyond the immediate warning of judgment to see a time of restoration. This…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Kings 15; 2 Chronicles 26 Things are bad up north. In Azariah’s reign, kings get assassinated in rapid succession in Israel. Inevitably, things in the south head south, too. Jehovah struck the king with leprosy and sent Rezin and Pekah against Judah (2 Kings 15:5, 37). It’s so sad because the start…

TODAY’S READING: Jonah Of all the prophetic books Jonah is unique as it’s a narrative, not poetry, exemplifying in so many ways that the work of missions is more often problematic than poetic. The irrepressible joy of God expressed by loving all peoples through allowing them to glorify Him bursts forth in this book. The…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Kings 14; 2 Chronicles 25 Jeroboam II was an evil king who restored and recaptured land to Israel, strengthening the northern Kingdom to its greatest extent since the days of Solomon (2 Kings 14:23, 25, 28). That a holy God used an evil leader as a result of Jonah’s prophesy (v. 24)…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Kings 12–13; 2 Chronicles 24 The sin of Jeroboam plagued the northern kingdom of Israel throughout its history, leading to its demise. Jeroboam excluded his people from the metanarrative, from the missionary covenant God made with Abraham and the fathers, by refusing to let Israel travel to the temple of Jehovah in…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Kings 9–11 The similarities between Jezebel and Babylon[1] are striking. Both encapsulate the timeless idolatries of money, sex, and power. Ideologies come and go, and kingdoms wax and wane, but all earthly systems (despite appearances initially and ongoing protests apologetically) center on the acquisition, retention, and abuse of money, sex, and power….

TODAY’S READING: 2 Kings 5–8 The prophets were not just sent to Israel and Judah; they were also sent to hold other nations accountable for their sins. “God was the rightful ruler of the whole earth, not just Israel. The prophets knew they were to speak to the nations.”[1] In the Old Testament period, “nobody…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Kings 1–4 Interpreters point out that Elijah was more verbose than Elisha, that Elijah gave more speeches and Elisha did more miracles. With varying percentages both prophets bore witness in sign and deed. Missionary life and witness requires the integration of sign, word, and deed with a priority on proclamation. We are…

TODAY’S READING: Obadiah; Psalms 82–83 As Old Testament Israel provided a living picture of what it meant for a nation (both ethnic people and geo-political state) to live under God’s blessing when they pursued God’s mission, so Edom provided the foil—the result when one worked against God’s mission. There is debate concerning the date that…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Chronicles 19–23 Any king and any tale are judged by whether they stay in covenant with God’s goal of ransoming and being worshiped by representatives of every tribe, tongue, people, and nation. This was why Jehoshaphat, when attacked by a coalition from Jordan (Ammonites, Moabites, and Edomites), called out to God—the God…

TODAY’S READING: 1 Kings 22; 2 Chronicles 18 Missions is a holy calling and a call to holiness. The missionary is a messenger who has the responsibility to speak and explain the full gospel. This message is increasingly unpopular, for it includes judgment and no flesh likes to be told that they are wrong, no…

TODAY’S READING: 1 Kings 20–21 There are spiritual wins, losses, and ties. In the grand missionary goal of God, representatives of all peoples are to be won to worship Jehovah. A sad missionary “tie” would be for the people of God to not win the nations and not lose their faith. A disastrous missionary loss…

TODAY’S READING: 1 Kings 17–19 Prophets were God’s incessant vocal reminders to His people of the meta-narrative: God will be Israel’s God; He will live among them and bless them; and Israel will be His holy missionary people, a joyful demonstration of how good Jehovah is that all the world might be attracted and join…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Chronicles 17 In the up and (mostly) down histories of Judah and Israel, Jehoshaphat’s early reign stands out as a high—a missionary high. This pericope in Chronicles lets us peek at what God intended to be normal. It is a short chapter that conjures up both sadness and joy, for what we…

TODAY’S READING: 1 Kings 15–16; 2 Chronicles 13–16 Abijam’s heart was not right before the Lord, not loyal to Jehovah like his ancestor David (1 Kings 15:3). David was credited with being loyal to Jehovah except in the case of Uriah the Hittite (v. 5). Which is fascinating. The one lapse of David was an…

TODAY’S READING: 2 Chronicles 10–12 Rehoboam’s folly is oft repeated by young, zealous missionaries. It is the hubristic mistake of despising the wisdom of the elders and discounting the experiences of the previous generation. Rehoboam rejected the advice of the elders, followed the advice of the young men, and did not listen to the people…

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